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HomeNewsworthyOpinion☕️ SWITCHEROO ☙ Saturday, March 4, 2023 ☙ C&C NEWS 🦠

☕️ SWITCHEROO ☙ Saturday, March 4, 2023 ☙ C&C NEWS 🦠

Club 14 Fitness

Opinion

By Jeff Childers

03-04-23

Good morning, C&C, and welcome to the Weekend Edition! Today’s roundup includes: Governor DeSantis moves in on another failed Soros-funded woke District Attorney; SADS stories about a professor of dermatology, young Hollywood celebrity drops dead at home, and a Canadian cancer surgeon gets turbo cancer; Justin Bieber finally cancels his world tour and probably his entire career; Mississippi joins other states banning sexual mutilation of minors; and a shocking story sets up my greatest “I told them so” opportunity.

🗞 *THE C&C ARMY POST* 🗞

🪖 A quick scheduling note: next Friday, March 10th, is my birthday (don’t ask), and coincidentally I’m leaving early for Coer d’Alene, Idaho, to give a talk out there in a blizzard or something. So between the two events, I’m expecting that next Friday will be sans post. I’m just letting you know early, so you can make plans. Extra coffee helps. Maybe catch up on an old post?

🗞*WORLD NEWS AND COMMENTARY* 🗞

🔥 The battle to purge lazy, failing, unqualified, woke, Soros-picked prosecutors continued in Florida this week, as described in an article from Florida’s Voice headlined, “DeSantis’ Office Demands Answers From Orlando Area State Attorney After Shooting.”

In a heartbreaking local story from February 22nd, Keith Melvin Moses was arrested for shooting five people in Pine Hills, Florida, killing three, including television reporter Dylan Lyons, 24, and a 9-year-old child. Moses had returned to the scene of his original crime and shot some more people.

I knew reporter Dylan Lyons. He used to work for a station in Gainesville (where I live), and covered several major stories involving my law firm. He was a talented and cheerful young man, a great reporter, and a very good person. Now he’s dead.

Here’s Melvin Moses:

Not surprisingly, Moses has an extensive criminal history including aggravated battery, assault, and grand theft. In 2021, Moses was arrested in Orange County for possession of cannabis, in an incident involving a firearm and gang activity, but Orlando State Attorney Monique Worrell dropped the case and let Moses go, for some reason.

Now three people are dead.

Here’s State Attorney Monique Worrell. I’ll let you say whether she is “woke:”

“Securing justice,” indeed. It’s just not “justice” justice. It’s some other kind of justice.

State Attorney Worrell, trying to get in front of the scandal, recently told reporters that she had no choice but to let Moses go, since he wasn’t carrying enough pot to support a decent prosecution. But Governor DeSantis’ office doesn’t believe that lame excuse either, and in a letter to State Attorney Worrell this week said:

“The failure of your office to hold this individual accountable for his actions – despite his extensive criminal history and gang affiliation – may have permitted this dangerous individual to remain on the street. Clearly, Mr. Moses should never have been in a position to commit those senseless crimes of last week.”

Last year, Governor DeSantis removed another State Attorney who refused to follow the law, so this letter is a legitimate threat. The Governor now wants a bunch of information from the State Attorney about Moses’ case, which predictably she will not want to give him.

This isn’t Ms. Worrell’s first time. It was easy to find previous complaints about the same thing — people dying after Worrell failed to prosecute. For example, here’s one from 2021:

Florida, at least, is a state where these execrable DA’s are being finally held accountable. Hopefully this kind of thing will spread. I’ll end this segment with a paragraph from the Florida’s Voice article, because it’s relevant to the final part of today’s post. Remember these facts about Moses and especially the MASKS:

As deputies approached the car, a stolen firearm was thrown out of the window. “It should be noted that all three subjects have multiple prior firearm possession charges, to include Attempted First Degree Murder and Armed Robbery with a Firearm and all had ski mask style masks on them or in the vehicle,” [Moses’s] arrest document said.

🔥 Beloved University of Naples (Italy) Professor of Dermatology Gabriella Fabbrocini, 58, died this week, finally succumbing to a rapid pancreatic cancer that suddenly and unexpectedly developed last summer.

Gabriella was active in many charitable organizations and was well-known for helping poor migrants with free medical care. Gabriella’s time on Earth was tragically cut short, but the good news is that she had all her doses, so don’t worry.

Gabriella trusted the science.

💉 Here’s another one. Walking Dead star Jansen Panettiere, 28, was discovered unresponsive AT HOME in his apartment by his family. He died right after that. According to a statement, Jansen died of an ENLARGED HEART. His young heart was just too big.

For some reason.

Jansen trusted the science, too, although he sort of noticed out of the corner of his eye that Science was holding something behind its back, but he since he trusted Science, he didn’t think anything of it, until — WHAM! — it was too late.

As usual, a Local 3 News article about his death ended with a dumb quote from some random person claiming Jansen was depressed. I guess that’s supposed to make us think he killed himself, rather than Science killed him. But … they’d already told readers the diagnosis was cardiomegaly. I don’t know how a person self-induces cardiomegaly. Weird.

Or maybe it’s even more insidious; maybe Local 3 was slyly suggesting it was all for the best. He was sad, so the successful actor is better off dead.

The gyrations that media is doing to try to pass off these tragic, untimely deaths are getting pretty wild. But it won’t work. We’re paying attention now.

💉 Here’s ANOTHER one. Popular St. Joseph’s (Canada) urologist and kidney cancer specialist Dr. Anil Kapoor died suddenly and unexpectedly on “February 28 after a short and courageous battle with an acute illness.”

That’s the new gag: “a short battle with an acute illness.” It usually means turbo-cancer, as it did here. I don’t need to remind you, do I, about Canada’s oppressive jab mandate for healthcare workers?

The hospital’s obituary statement for its deceased doc accidentally included a remarkably ironic bit:

“Dr. Kapoor was deeply committed to pursuing new knowledge, testing new medications and employing laparoscopic surgical techniques to help those living with cancers[.]”

“Testing new medications”! His obituary should’ve included a spoiler warning. That kind of gave the plot away, didn’t it?

💉 Also on February 28th, the LA Times ran a story headlined, “Justin Bieber’s ‘Justice’ World Tour Canceled After Several Postponements.”

The article begins with this short, direct sentence: “Justin Bieber‘s ‘Justice’ world tour has come to an abrupt end.”

Yeah it did. Right along with Justin’s meteoric career. You know what a meteor is, right? A fiery rock that crashes into the Earth and explodes.

Justin Bieber, 29, trusted the science. Now, after several postponements, the singer and his team have seemingly called off the remaining shows of the tour’s European leg and more. Fans on Twitter shared screenshots from ticket sales platforms announcing that their upcoming events have been canceled as well.

That’s it, it’s a wrap.

You’ll probably recall that last summer, Bieber announced he’d developed a type of facial paralysis called Ramsay Hunt Syndrome — a known side effect from the covid vaccinations similar to Guillain-Barré syndrome — and that he was going to rest for a while, to get his health back.

It’s not back.

And it’s ironic his tour was called “Justice.” If Justin could sue the jab makers, his damages would be astronomical. I’m not kidding. I’d bet a jury might award Justin a billion dollars in lost career revenue. And he’d deserve every penny.

But justice is scarce for the vaccine injured at the moment.

Only at the moment.

🔥 Last week, CNN ran an article headlined, “Mississippi Enacts Ban On Gender-Affirming Care For Transgender Minors.”

On February 28th, Republican Governor of Mississippi Tate Reeves signed HB 1125 into law, which bans so-called “gender-affirming” care for minor children (anyone under 18). In other words, the new law criminalizes sexually mutilating minors, whether it’s by using drugs or knives.

There seems to be a trend starting. Earlier this month, South Dakota passed a similar ban, and Utah also put one the books in January. Last fall, Florida’s Board of Medicine passed new rules prohibiting gender-affirming surgery and puberty blocking hormones for minors. It’s a start.

If the sanctimonious parents of trans youth actually believed their own ludicrous claims that trans care is critically necessary to stop their kids from suiciding in packs, and it’s not just that trans kids are now élite virtue-signaling accessories, then all those parents should be relocating to California, or another wacky state permitting the gender-bending treatments, right?

😷 Finally, my favorite piece of the year. I PROMISE YOU that I am not making this up. Last week, Local ABC 7 in New York ran a story headlined, “NYPD’s Latest Guidance On Crime Fighting Efforts Put NYC Shop Owners In Tight Spot.”

In other words, Bronx cops are trying to wrestle down an outbreak of violent daylight robberies, and have asked for help from the public — particular from local business people:

Police say they’re having trouble identifying suspects who target stores because they’re wearing masks. They are now urging store owners to be proactive in the crime fighting effort.
“We are asking the businesses to make this a condition of entry, that people when they come in, they show their face, they should identify themselves,” NYPD Chief of Department Jeffrey Maddrey said.

Hahaha! A no-mask rule?? First they tell us we have to make customers wear masks, then they tell us to make customers NOT wear masks. This ridiculous but totally-predictable and completely foreseeable development still caught everyone off guard. Store owners in the Bodega aren’t exactly sure how they can safely enforce such a rule, given how … um … “passionate” mask-wearers are.

“We don’t have a weapon to defend ourselves,” Marte said. “That would be great, everyone come with their face up so the camera can see, we all can see. But we cannot force them to take off the mask.”
Marte says that would lead to confrontation with customers who still want to mask up because of COVID.

This story is wonderful on one level — the hypocritical about-face that is already in New York and I’m sure will be coming to a location near you soon. But I’m sorry, but this is an irresistible “I told them so” moment. Let me show you how from the very beginning I knew for SURE — as a lawyer — that masks were a horrible idea.

I filed my appellate brief in my winning mask lawsuit back in June of 2020 — after all the trial litigation over the injunction was complete. I’d lost at the trial court and was headed into an emergency appeal. I worked harder on that brief than just about anything in my career.

First, I cited several developing 2020 news items in my Appellate index, which show that a lot of people were ALREADY noticing about the emerging, mask-related violent crime problem; at least, before they weren’t allowed to report it anymore:

That was THREE YEARS AGO! But even before that, we had clues much, much earlier. Far beyond the basic fact that dozens or hundred of pre-pandemic scientific studies had found masks failed to mitigate influenza, the law had long been aware of the social risks posed by public face masking.

For example, on page 31 of my brief, I cited a 1990 case where Georgia’s Supreme Court — upholding a law BANNING public mask wearing — observed masks have been criminals’ trademarks FROM THE BEGINNING OF TIME:

My arguments were met by lazy, scoffing lawyers who didn’t bother doing any research of their own — who mostly dismissed my cases as just being about awful Ku Klux Klan behavior. Wrong! Not one single case cited in my brief was a Klan case. I left all the many Klan mask cases out of my brief, on purpose, knowing my opponents would get too distracted by the racial issue to wrestle with the underlying logic, even though the reason Klan members shouldn’t mask in public is exactly the same reason nobody else should either.

When I pointed out that to my opponents there were TONS of mask cases having nothing to do with the Klan, it was like their brains suddenly malfunctioned, sparked out, and everyone just moved on to their next arguments. It was vexing.

In another example cited in my brief, the 11th Circuit overturned Georgia’s ban on public masking on First Amendment grounds, but observed that the Georgia Supremes found the practice of wearing masks in public was intimately associated with violence:

It wasn’t a brand-new idea that the Georgia Supreme Court suddenly knitted together out of conspiracy theories. In 1995 — the same year the 11th Circuit struck down Georgia’s ban on public face masks — the well-respected Seventh Circuit held the most irresponsible thing a court could possibly do would be to allow people to wear face masks inside a courtroom:

In other words, the well-respected 7th Circuit Court of Appeals thought letting someone get away with wearing a mask inside would be the dumbest thing a court could ever do. It never occurred to the 7th Circuit judges, not in their wildest, extra-spicy-hot-wing-fueled nightmares, that a court might actually ORDER people to wear masks in the courtroom.

They’d have laughed you right out of court.

But twenty-five years later, every court in the land shot past what the 7th Circuit had already decided was the MOST irresponsible thing possible, by REQUIRING masks in courtrooms. And nobody even bothered trying to say WHY they were ignoring all that case law.

Some people wonder why I’ve always been so scornful of mask wearing. It’s because I started researching all this case law in May of 2020. I could not find one single case — anywhere — that found mask wearing was a good idea. To the contrary, a lot of really smart judges had found mask wearing was a terrible idea.

This legal “switcheroo” on masking is one of the things that absolutely convinced me in 2020 that we were riding out a worldwide mass delusion. It’s not like the experts didn’t KNOW about all these problems, problems that EVERYONE has known about SINCE THE DAWN OF TIME.

In 2020, they already knew public masking would lead to violence and crime. They KNEW it. But they did it anyway. And — never EVER let someone tell you that mask wearing is harmless. Tell them to try arguing that to the shop owner in the ABC 7 article who said he’s been shot THREE TIMES.

The good news is that, to my knowledge, my case is the only mask case that made it to an appellate court. And my appellate court found that mask mandates were presumptively unconstitutional and tore execrable Alachua county a new orifice. So the law stands undisturbed: masks are bad news.

If you’ve never read my wonderful appellate opinion, which still stands as good law, never overturned, here’s a link. You’re welcome.

Have a terrific weekend! I’ll see you guys back here on Monday, to kick of another great week of Coffee & Covid.

Join C&C in moving the needle and changing minds. I could use your help getting the truth out and spreading optimism and hope, if you can: https://www.coffeeandcovid.com/p/-learn-how-to-get-involved-

Twitter: @jchilders98.
Truth Social: @jchilders98.
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Emailed Daily Newsletter: https://www.coffeeandcovid.com

© 2022, Jeff Childers, all rights reserved

Published with author’s permission.


The views and opinions expressed in this commentary are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official position of Citizens Journal Florida.

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